Submission

Hey, the submission deadline last week was detailed as the end of February. So I spent the weekend working on this (below) only to find today that the submission deadline has moved! Well, I’ve put the work in so want you to see it. Here below is the supporting material in the format requested.

Given that I have just created a dedicated website to the body of work entitled Paralysis Unseen, I found this invitation for submissions on the theme of subculture and thought it would fit quite well. However the publishers cut short the submission deadline from the end of February to today, but because I had worked up the submission, I decided to put it in anyway. I’m glad I did as they responded by accepting it. Smile

The guidelines were straight forward and so I sent them jpg images of Documented, Experienced, Imagined, Signified, along with the website link and this short synopsis about the work. Here is what I said.

 

image

Synopsis
Recent changes in the representation of disabled people have widened from one representing them through the prisms of victims, freaks or in-valids, to some limited photographic representation and interpretation that recognises and acknowledges us as political, sporting, sexual – that is – cultural beings. But representations of disability, as distinct from impairment or disabled people are rare (Hevey, 1992, p12). Accordingly viewers are almost trained to fail to see any connotation regarding disability when the impaired body is not in view, and when it is the impairment appears to dominate the vista. That is one of the paradoxes disability arts faces (Darke, 2003, pp131-141). The result is a type of visual hegemony. This set of images speaks to that fact: disability is a cultural experience borne out of impairment.


Hevey, D. (1992) The Creatures that Time Forgot, Published by Routledge, p. 12

Darke, P. A. (2003) ‘Now I Know Why Disability Art Is Drowning in the River Lethe (thanks to Pierre Bourdieu)’ in Disability, Culture and Identity, Riddell, S. and Watson, N. (eds), Published by Routledge. pp. 131-141

Advertisements

About anomiepete

South Londoner struggling with life, art and photography.
This entry was posted in exhibition and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Submission

  1. Tanya says:

    in-valid, wow, I never read it that way before.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s